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Graduate study is a major investment in your personal and professional future. We aid graduate students through a wealth of funding opportunities, and have a team of supportive staff who can help you navigate the process.

Although the specifics vary from program to program, the University helps graduate and professional school students pay for their educations in numerous ways—through direct funding and through facilitating eligible student participation in federal loan programs. The vast majority of doctoral students receive a full, five-year package, including tuition and a stipend. Master’s programs differ more widely, with many offering some merit aid awards, and a few offering need based aid. You should review the specific details of the programs you are considering to determine what types of aid they offer. In addition, because of the prestige attached to holding a competitive award and because the University cannot offer funding to every candidate, students are always encouraged to explore outside funding in their field.

Information on external awards available to incoming students can be found in the fellowships section. In addition, the University offers a wide array of opportunities for paid employment, educational benefits for veterans, teaching or research assistantships, fellowships or grants, and other financial aid.

Funding Packages

The University of Chicago offers most doctoral students competitive funding packages, which cover tuition and student health insurance, as well as a stipend for living expenses and research support. These awards are typically for five years, with some variation by field, comparable to that at other institutions. Programs which are exceptions articulate their policies clearly on their own web sites. Because the cost of living in Chicago is notably lower than in many other major cities, our stipends allow for a comfortable lifestyle. For more information about specific funding for your degree program, please refer to the financial aid information for the programs you intend to apply to.

For some students, the nature of their project is such that it takes more than five years to complete the degree. In these cases, a wealth of additional opportunities are available, including continued funding by a research group; fellowships which support language study, travel, or dissertation research; and on- and off-campus positions teaching or exploring other career paths.

Fellowships

UChicago students are among the leading recipients of competitive external funding – in fact, our graduate students have received more Fulbright–Hays dissertation awards than those from any other institution. Most divisions and schools, as well as many individual programs and departments, maintain lists of fellowships and other funding sources relevant to students in their fields. In addition to these tailored resources, UChicagoGRAD provides information on a wide range of fellowship opportunities and support throughout the fellowship process.

Academic & Career Development

UChicagoGRAD supports graduate and professional students by providing information and advice on funding opportunities and student resources. Explore instructional videos, sample essays, and informational databases. We also offer one-on-one counseling and assistance with applying for various fellowships.

Fellowship Database

A robust listing of fellowships, including opportunities for students in specific fields, international students, and students of color, can be found in our online database.

Office of Multicultural Student Affairs (OMSA)

In addition to the list of fellowships available for students of color and underrepresented minorities available here, there are other resources available as well. The Office of Multicultural Student Affairs (OMSA) supports the academic success of students of color at the University of Chicago and works to build an inclusive campus community. OMSA offers grants and funding, as well as career and professional resources.

Student Employment

During their time at UChicago, students can find a variety of employment opportunities that support and complement their education without interfering with their studies. On- and off-campus internships such as the Higher Education Interns program offer students an opportunity to explore options and gain skills, and several services help connect students to these positions or directly employ students.

Student Jobs Database

This site, which requires a UChicago CNet ID to access fully, lists a wide range of jobs for current students, including teaching and assistantship opportunities.

UChicago Marketplace

This university-specific site is similar to Craig’s List, with postings for jobs in addition to a wide array of other offerings.

Neighborhood Schools Program (NSP)

NSP employs work-study and some non-work-study students in area schools and community organizations as teaching assistants and tutors, technology assistants, and more.

University Community Service Center (UCSC)

UCSC facilitates off-campus work-study jobs with Chicago area nonprofit organizations focusing on research, community outreach, communications, direct service with children, and more.

University of Chicago Medicine Employment

database of full- and part-time administrative and clerical positions at the on-campus medical center.

Chicago Center for Teaching (CCT)

The CCT offers workshops, seminars, and consultation to hone your teaching skills, as well as employing current graduate students, and may have information on local institutions seeking instructors.

Employment Information for International Students

The Office of International Affairs (OIA) maintains information on the forms and requirements for international students with F-1 or J-1 status who seek employment in the United States.

Loan Programs

Loan programs augment any other aid students have received from the University and from outside funding sources. Find details of all loan programs and application instructions on the Office of Financial Aid website. In order to apply for student loans through the University, you will need your University ID (“CNet ID”), and to complete the FAFSA after January 1.

Educational Benefits for Veterans

The University of Chicago welcomes veterans and their dependents to our community. The University’s Veterans Services, through the Office of the Registrar, helps veteran students or eligible dependents obtain educational benefits from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

The Post-9/11 GI Bill

Commonly known as The Yellow Ribbon Program, this initiative provides funding for post-9/11 servicemen and women to attend the University, in partnership with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Yellow Ribbon applicants must be admitted and have confirmed their intent to enroll into an academic program before submitting a Yellow Ribbon application to the University of Chicago, and acceptance in the program is on a first-come, first-serve basis, although most programs do not limit the number of participants. Specialist advisers in the Office of the Registrar assist individuals who need enrollment certification sent to the U.S. Department of Veterans Administration.

Your investment in a master’s degree at the University of Chicago can pay life–long dividends—advancing your academic and professional career, and developing critical skills and valuable connections with world–class peers. The availability of aid to master’s degree candidates directly from the schools and divisions varies widely, with many programs offering some partial- to full-tuition merit awards, a few offering need‐based aid, and some programs offering little or no institutional aid. Such institutional aid awards are typically offered at the time an admissions decision is made, and in the case of merit awards, require no separate application.

We encourage all students to explore the availability of outside sources of funding they may be eligible for, such as grants, fellowships, or government scholarships. For many students, education loans may be one source of funding for the degree. If you are considering using student loans to finance your education, you should review the information below regarding the application process for federal student loans. We encourage applicants to consider their own circumstances and goals in making decisions about funding their program of study.

Student Loans

It is crucial to consider the cost of each master’s program to which you apply, and to have an understanding of how you will pay for the degree. Many students finance their education using student loans. If you are planning to do so, be sure to understand the terms of repayment before you apply. Admitted students will receive additional information from their program on submitting the FAFSA and receiving a loan eligibility package. Our Office of Financial Aid manages this process for graduate students. Here are helpful websites that deal with this topic:

Fellowships

In addition to merit– or need–based aid offered at the time of admission, the University also offers other funding opportunities to support academic and professional development during the course of study. Start researching programs early to identify these opportunities. The University maintains a databases to assist students in searching for these fellowships here. Filter by “Master’s” to identify sources of supplemental funding. This database includes fellowships unique to UChicago as well as funding provided by external organizations.

Student Employment

During their time at UChicago, students can find a variety of employment opportunities that support and complement their education without interfering with their studies. On- and off-campus internships such as the Higher Education Fellows program offer students an opportunity to explore options and gain skills, and several services help connect students to these positions or directly employ students.

Student Jobs Database

This site, which requires a UChicago CNet ID to access fully, lists a wide range of jobs for current students, including teaching and assistantship opportunities.

UChicago Marketplace

This university-specific site is similar to Craig’s List, with postings for jobs in addition to a wide array of other offerings.

Neighborhood Schools Program (NSP)

NSP employs work-study and some non-work-study students in area schools and community organizations as teaching assistants and tutors, technology assistants, and more.

University Community Service Center (UCSC)

UCSC facilitates off-campus work-study jobs with Chicago area nonprofit organizations focusing on research, community outreach, communications, direct service with children, and more.

University of Chicago Medicine Employment

database of full- and part-time administrative and clerical positions at the on-campus medical center.

Chicago Center for Teaching (CCT)

The CCT offers workshops, seminars, and consultation to hone your teaching skills, as well as employing current graduate students, and may have information on local institutions seeking instructors.

Employment Information for International Students

The Office of International Affairs (OIA) maintains information on the forms and requirements for international students with F-1 or J-1 status who seek employment in the United States.

Loan Programs

Loan programs augment any other aid students have received from the University and from outside funding sources. Find details of all loan programs for domestic citizens and application instructions on the Student Loan Administration website. In order to apply for student loans through the University, you will need to complete the FAFSA after January 1.

Educational Benefits for Veterans

The University of Chicago welcomes veterans and their dependents to our community. The University’s Veterans Services, through the Office of the Registrar, helps veteran students or eligible dependents obtain educational benefits from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

The Post-9/11 GI Bill

Commonly known as The Yellow Ribbon Program, this initiative provides funding for post-9/11 servicemen and women to attend the University, in partnership with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Yellow Ribbon applicants must be admitted and have confirmed their intent to enroll into an academic program before submitting a Yellow Ribbon application to the University of Chicago, and acceptance in the program is on a first-come, first-serve basis, although most programs do not limit the number of participants. Specialist advisers in the Office of the Registrar assist individuals who need enrollment certification sent to the U.S. Department of Veterans Administration.

Funding for international graduate students in most programs is similar to that offered to domestic students. Doctoral students in a given program, for example, are typically all eligible for the same funding package regardless of citizenship status. In many cases, your government or other agencies or corporations in your home country may offer funding for study in the U.S., which we strongly encourage you to explore.

External Funding

A wide variety of funding sources may be available to you, depending upon your area of study, home country, and other factors. Education USA advisors in 400 locations around the world can often offer guidance and information on the graduate school application and admissions process, and along with other organizations, such as the Institute of International Education, typically maintains lists of region-specific funding sources. UChicago’s Office of International Affairs (OIA) has a list of some major sources of funding available here.

Fellowships

The University of Chicago offers the majority of incoming doctoral students competitive five-year funding packages, which cover tuition and student health insurance and also include a stipend for living expenses and research support. For more information about specific funding for your degree program, please refer to the financial aid information for each division or professional school.

Loans

In most cases, international students cannot participate in U.S. federal loan programs, but may still apply for private alternative loans in the United States. (Please note that some of these loans may require a co-signer in the U.S.) Foreign applicants are urged to seek aid from other areas (such as fellowships awarded through their home country) before seeking admission to a graduate program at the University of Chicago.

Student Employment

During their time at UChicago, students can find a variety of employment opportunities that support their education without interfering with their studies. The majority of student jobs on campus are open to all current students, regardless of their citizenship. The Office of International Affairs (OIA) provides forms, requirements and job search advice for international students with F-1 or J-1 status who seek employment in the United States. Visit Employment Information for International Students for more information.

OIA Resources

The Office of International Affairs (OIA) and the College’s Career Advancement office have teamed up to create a host of exciting events for international students embarking on their job search. Please see the OIA’s Calendar for upcoming events.

Unpaid Internships and Volunteer Positions

Students may work as volunteers or unpaid interns without additional authorization, where this practice does not violate U.S. labor law.